“What Determines Productivity,” C. Syverson (2011)

Chad Syverson, along with Nick Bloom, John van Reenen, Pete Klenow and many others, has been at the forefront of a really interesting new strand of the economics literature: persistent differences in productivity. Syverson looked at productivity differences within 4-digit SIC industries in the US (quite narrow industries like “Greeting Cards” or “Industrial Sealants”) a number of years back, and found that in the average industry, the 90-10 ratio of total factor productivity plants was almost 2. That is, the top decile plant in the average industry produced twice as much output as the bottom decline plant, using exactly the same inputs! Hsieh and Klenow did a similar exercise in China and India and found even starker productivity differences, largely due a big left-tail of very low productivity firms. This basic result is robust to different measures of productivity, and to different techniques for identifying differences; you can make assumptions which let you recover a Solow residual directly, or run a regression (adjusting for differences in labor and capital quality, or not), or look at deviations like firms having higher marginal productivity of labor than the wage rate, etc. In the paper discussed in the post, Syverson summarizes the theoretical and empirical literature on persistent productivity differences.

Why aren’t low productivity firms swept from the market? We know from theory that if entry is allowed, potentially infinite and instantaneous, then no firm can remain which is less productive than the entrants. This suggests that persistence of inefficient firms must result from either limits on entry, limits on expansion by efficient firms, or non-immediate efficiency because of learning-by-doing or similar (a famous study by Benkard of a Lockwood airplane showed that a plant could produce a plane with half the labor hours after producing 30, and half again after producing 100). Why don’t inefficient firms already in the market adopt best practices? This is related to the long literature on diffusion, which Syverson doesn’t cover in much detail, but essentially it is not obvious to a firm whether a “good” management practice at another firm is actually good or not. Everett Rogers, in his famous “Diffusion of Innovations” book, refers to a great example of this from Peru in the 1950s. A public health consultant was sent for two years to a small village, and tried to convince the locals to boil their water before drinking it. The water was terribly polluted and the health consequences of not boiling were incredible. After two years, only five percent of the town adopted the “innovation” of boiling. Some didn’t adopt because it was too hard, many didn’t adopt because of a local belief system that suggested only the already-sick ought drink boiled water, some didn’t adopt because they didn’t trust the experience of the advisor, et cetera. Diffusion is difficult.

Ok, so given that we have inefficient firms, what is the source of the inefficiency? It is difficult to decompose all of the effects. Learning-by-doing is absolutely relevant in many industries – we have plenty of evidence on this count. Nick Bloom and coauthors seem to suggest that management practices play a huge role. They have shown clear correlation between “best practice” management and high TFP across firms, and a recent randomized field experiment in India (discussed before on this site) showed massive impacts on productivity from management improvements. Regulation and labor/capital distortions also appear to play quite a big role. On this topic, James Schmitz wrote a very interesting paper, published in 2005 in the JPE, on iron ore producers. TFP in Great Lakes ore had been more or less constant for many decades, with very little entry or foreign competition until the 1980s. Once Brazil began exporting ore to the US, labor productivity doubled within a handful of years, and capital and total factor productivity also soared. A main driver of the change was more flexible workplace rules.

Final version in 2011 JEP (IDEAS version). Syverson was at Kellogg recently presenting a new paper of his, with an all-star cast of coauthors, on the medical market. It’s well worth reading. Medical productivity is similarly heterogeneous, and since the medical sector is coming up on 20% of GDP, the sources of inefficiency in medicine are particularly important!

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